HMAS WYATT EARP: Australia’s earliest national Antarctic research vessel

Wyatt Earp moored on the edge of Antarctic pack ice, February 1948. The little wooden ship - with a very unlikely name - pioneered Australia’s expeditions into the Antarctic as part of the Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition (ANARE). ANMM Collection ANMS1445[076].

Wyatt Earp moored on the edge of Antarctic pack ice, February 1948. The little wooden ship – with a very unlikely name – pioneered Australia’s expeditions into the Antarctic as part of the Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition (ANARE). ANMM Collection ANMS1445[076].

Remembering the ‘Twerp

On 26 December 1947, a small, nondescript wooden-hulled motor vessel set off from Hobart, bound for Antarctica. Its silhouette resembled that of an ageing offshore fishing craft, but its weather deck was packed from stem to stern with supplies and equipment – including a single-engine Vought-Sikorsky Kingfisher floatplane. At the helm was Commander Karl E Oom, an officer in the Royal Australian Navy (RAN). He was supported by five naval officers, 22 ratings, a Royal Australian Air Force pilot and air fitter mechanic, and an Australian Department of Information photographer. The complement was rounded out by four civilian scientists who were responsible for conducting a series of experiments, and observing meteorological and other natural phenomena in the Antarctic. Their voyage would be the first to operate under the banner of the Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition (ANARE), a series of post-war initiatives to establish Australian scientific research stations in Antarctica and the sub-Antarctic territories of Heard Island and Macquarie Island. ANARE laid the foundation for the establishment of the Australian Antarctic Division, and in later years Australia’s polar research ships could trace their lineage back to the little timber craft then making its way towards the world’s southernmost continent: HMAS Wyatt Earp.

Continue reading

Napoleon’s artists and their new views of Australia

Lesueur made detailed sketches of Sydney. This view was made looking across Sydney Cove from where the Sydney Opera House now stands. Museum d’histoire naturelle, Le Havre.

Lesueur made detailed sketches of Sydney. This view was made looking across Sydney Cove from where the Sydney Opera House now stands. Museum d’histoire naturelle, Le Havre.

In April 1802 when the lookout station situated on the southern headland at the entrance to Port Jackson reported the sighting of a French naval vessel approaching, the news spread quickly through the streets of Sydney. Isolated on the far side of the world from England, it was normal for news of the arrival of a ship to cause excitement at the prospect of news from Europe and the hope of fresh supplies. The armed corvette Le Naturaliste however, was an unusual arrival and unlikely to bring much comfort to the town.

Continue reading

September Signals magazine available from the App Store

Signals quarterly magazine is now available via the App store. Image: ANMM.

Signals quarterly magazine is now available via the App store. Image: ANMM.

Signals on the iPad offers the same quality editorial and sumptuous pictures as the print magazine, combined with the convenience of digital delivery – ensuring you can access it almost anywhere on the planet.

The September edition is out now.  It includes features describing our maritime archaeology team’s search for the relics of an India-trade horse transport on the Barrier Reef, how Dirk Hartog’s accidental landing 400 years ago put the west coast of Australia on the map and how a 100-year-old fragment of film inspired a contemporary artist from Arnhem Land to create spirit figures embodying Yolngu culture.

Continue reading

Nominations are open for $5,000 maritime history prizes

Winner of the 2013 Frank Broeze Memorial Maritime History Prize was John Odgen for his two-volume set Saltwater People.

Winner of the 2013 Frank Broeze Memorial Maritime History Prize was John Odgen for his two-volume set Saltwater People.

Every two years, the museum, in association with the Australian Association for Maritime History (AAMH), jointly sponsors two maritime history prizes totalling $5,000.

Anyone – writers, publishers or readers – can nominate a work for these awards. Nominations close on 30 April 2015.

Continue reading