International Fleet Review 5 day voyage: Day 4

After an eventful couple of days, we resumed our voyage to Jervis Bay. Although we remain slightly short-handed, we still managed to set the fore and main courses, the fore and main topsails, the spritsail, sprit topsail, fore topmast, main topmast and mizzen staysails and the jib, with the breeze on the quarter, it was time for the crew to take in its surroundings.

Soaking up the sunshine

Soaking up the sunshine

Noting the work put in by them, the routine was relaxed a little and for a lot of the day, the voyage crew were allowed to keep their hammocks slung so they could sleep. If they weren’t all snuggled into their bunks, they took the opportunity on deck to soak up the sunshine and sea air.

Lessons on square rigged sailing

Lessons on square rigged sailing

A feature of sailing in Endeavour is the opportunity to understand square rigged sailing to a better level and the officers and watch leaders had regular sessions during the day on the use of sails and running rigging. This hopefully helped to explain to the voyage crew just what they had been doing over the last few days.

Point Perpendicular

Point Perpendicular

At approximately 1600, as we neared Point Perpendicular, the crew were all called up on deck, to hand in sail, begin furling and range the anchor cable on deck. Under the lee in the northern corner of the bay, the stream anchor was deployed with five shackles of anchor cable. Almost immediately the strong nor’easter eased and the ship settled for the night.

Main Mast

Main Mast

International Fleet Review 5 day voyage: Day 3

After a busy night furling sprits’ls at nearly midnight, wearing ship at 3am and quite lumpy weather, an exciting day was sure to come!

With the crew up and about, the morning meeting was called to let them know of today’s plan. The crew was informed that the ship would be picking up more passengers during the afternoon.

After the meeting, all hands were called for sail handling as the ship was prepared to motor into Darling Harbour. Arriving off Sydney Heads, the crew was treated to its own naval review as the ship was passed by a large number of warships leaving Australia to return home. Many had come to this country from all over the world to help celebrate the International Fleet Review.

Motoring into Darling Harbour

Motoring into Darling Harbour

Once the naval vessels had cleared the heads, Endeavour made her way through to Darling Harbour where we rendezvoused with the museum’s tender. Radio communications were established and three new voyage crew joined to enjoy some 18th century sailing.

New voyage crew joining the vessel

New voyage crew joining the vessel

We cleared the heads at about 5.30 PM and started making our way south towards Jervis Bay where we plan to anchor tomorrow night. This will give the voyage crew a well earned rest and a taste of this beautiful harbour.

All is well.

Week 14

The Standing rigging is now complete. The main challenge was the rat lines (the netting the sailors used to climb up the mast). Following are six images showing the technique I used to get the effect I was after. As I have seen many examples of well-made models that have been let down only by hairy unnatural rigging poking in all directions, one of my main concerns was to get the ratlines to loop down in a natural way.

Overall view of the model

Overall view of the model

Image A

Once the main lines (made from 0.8mm thread) had been fitted to the mast and deadeyes, I drew up spacing lines on a card where the ratlines were to be placed.

Image A and B "How to"

Image A and B "How to"

Image B

Using a thick needle and ratlines made of 0.25mm thread, I held the thick down line with tweezers  pushed the needle through each large thread in turn. Using the back cardboard spacer, I repeated the process until all the vertical ratlines were in place, as per Image C.

Images C and D "How to"

Images C and D "How to"

Image D shows how, using another piece of thread, I tied a knot at the right end of each vertical line. A drop of superglue was then carefully placed on each knot. Not only does this hold all in palace, but it makes it much easier to cut the ends of the knot cleanly with fine wire nippers.

Image E shows the tweezers holding thread down whilst I superglued the next intersection of the lines.  The glue dries almost immediately, and the line retains its downward loop. One has to be careful not to use too much however, as it distorts the effect.  I decided that I would not add a knot to all of the downward lines, just the ends, as at this scale it would be ‘over the top’.

Images E and F "How to"

Images E and F "How to"

Image F shows the finished effect.

Close-up of completed standing rigging

Close-up of completed standing rigging

This section of the rigging took me three days to complete, and I have had a neck ache for the whole of the weekend…model-makers beware!! Running rigging is to be completed next.

Contributed by model-maker Mike Bass.