Introducing the Seabin project

The Seabin Project develops upstream solutions for waterways adjacent to high population areas, such as marinas, ports and public waterways. This is a front-line approach: if you can capture the debris deposited into the water at its most common source (near land), less garbage will work its way out into the oceans. Image: Seabin Project.

The Seabin Project develops upstream solutions for waterways adjacent to high population areas, such as marinas, ports and public waterways. This is a front-line approach: if you can capture the debris deposited into the water at its most common source (near land), less garbage will work its way out into the oceans. Image: Seabin Project.

Bin it to win it

Once upon a time, two surfers got sick of swimming in garbage. Unlike most of us, they decided to do something about it. In 2015, Andrew Turton and Pete Ceglinski quit their jobs and sourced seed funding from Shark Mitigation Systems to design a prototype ocean garbage collecting ‘Seabin’. This began a journey of research and product development that would take them around the world. Today, they are finally bringing their invention home to Australia.

The Seabin Project develops upstream solutions for waterways adjacent to high population areas, such as marinas, ports and public waterways. This is a front-line approach: if you can capture the debris deposited into the water at its most common source (near land), less garbage will work its way out into the oceans.

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‘The greatest threat to our oceans is ignorance’

shutterstock_112786813_irabel Ocean wave

When we think of threats to our oceans we might think of pollution, climate change or over-fishing. But there is another, bigger danger – one that underpins all these. Ignorance. This is either a lack of knowledge about what is going on with our oceans, or just simply taking them for granted – ignoring them as if they will always be there, and always beautiful and plentiful.

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