George Cruikshank: Satirising the Eastern trade

'An interesting scene on board an East-Indiaman, showing the effects of a heavy lurch, after dinner' by George Cruikshank, 1818 Currently on display in the museum's latest exhibition, East of India - Forgotten trade with Australia ANMM Collection

‘An interesting scene on board an East-Indiaman, showing the effects of a heavy lurch, after dinner’ by George Cruikshank, 1818
Currently on display in the museum’s latest exhibition, East of India – Forgotten trade with Australia
ANMM Collection

‘“Make us laugh or you starve—Give us fresh fun; we have eaten up the old and are hungry”’
~ William Makepeace Thackeray, 1840

In his work, An essay on the genius of George Cruikshank, the English novelist William Makepeace Thackeray wrote in admiration for one of the most famous illustrators of his day. Thackeray was trying to convey how a ‘greedy public’ has ‘bought, borrowed or stole’ a ‘heap of personal kindnesses from George Cruikshank’ and therefore owed a great deal to the caricaturist. In a way, one of Cruikshank’s ‘kindnesses’, an engraving from the museum’s collection, portrays the essence of what Thackeray was trying to say. The themes of greed, fickleness and arrogance highlighted by Thackeray, are illustrated brilliantly in Cruikshank’s caricature which is currently on display in the museum’s latest exhibition, East of India – Forgotten trade with Australia. Continue reading