About Anne Doran

I work at the Australian National Maritime Museum as an Education Officer.

A Hawaiian Friendship Ceremony: Marking 75 years of War and Peace in the Pacific

Formal surrender ceremonies on the USS MISSOURI in Tokyo Bay. Image: Naval History and Heritage Command.

Formal surrender ceremonies on the USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay. Images: Naval History and Heritage Command.

This year the formal learning team, funded through the USA Bicentennial Gift Fund, embarked on a new and very different project, reflecting on the cumulative 75th anniversaries relating to World War II in the Pacific. We invited schools from the USA, Japan and Australia to research and reflect on significant battles from the conflict in the Pacific.

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War and Peace in the Pacific 75 education project

USS Lexington during the Battle of the Coral Sea, May 1942. Image: Naval History and Heritage Command.

USS Lexington during the Battle of the Coral Sea, May 1942. Image: Naval History and Heritage Command.

Three years ago the museum’s education team and the NSW Department of Education began to investigate how to run a student-centred research program to engage high school students with stories from World War II (WWII). This program would mark the significant anniversaries of the WWII battles in the Pacific. Eight high schools from Australia and the USA joined the scheme this year to research ‘War and Peace in the Pacific 75 years’, a project funded by the Australian National Maritime Museum, Sydney Australia, the New South Wales Department of Education – Learning Systems Directorate and supported by the USA Bicentennial Gift Fund.

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Cook and Banks: Charting the rumoured great Southern Land

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The Australian National Maritime Museum and Royal Botanical Gardens Sydney will offering a joint video conference for year 3 and 4 students History and Science.

Cook and Banks: Charting the rumoured great Southern Land is a free video conference which will outline Cook and Banks voyage on the HMB Endeavour. It will be presented by our curator Kieran Hosty and Mary Bell from Royal Botantical Gardens Sydney.

The video conference will investigate the story behind Cook and Banks’ voyage to the rumoured great Southern Land and include topics such as:

  • The reason behind the momentous voyage.
  • The voyage and conditions on board the HMB Endeavour.
  • Cook’s role as a cartographer and navigator.
  • Banks’ scientific contribution to the voyage and how his legacy began the Royal Botanic Gardens’ Herbarium collection.
  • Learn how scientists classify plants and try your hand at botanic illustration.
  • The enduring outcome of the voyage and how it changed Australian history.
  • What happened the HMB Endeavour?

We will be offering six sessions of the Cook and Banks virtual excursion. The sessions will be offered on DART connections 3rd and 4th May at 10.00am, 11.30am and 2.00pm

— Anne Doran, Education Officer. 

Find out more about our education programs on our website.

Ships, Clocks and Stars FREE teacher preview this June

Teacher preview of ANMM exhibitions 'Ships, Clocks & Stars' and Endeavour tour.

Teacher preview of ANMM exhibitions ‘Ships, Clocks & Stars’ and Endeavour tour.

Join us for a private viewing of this fascinating and beautiful exhibition on Thursday 16 June 5.00pm – 7.00pm. Hear about our exciting new school programs and board HMB Endeavour to experience what life was really like on an 18th-century vessel. Afterwards, see the museum’s Vivid display – a spectacular rooftop projection viewed from our special vantage point.

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World Environment Day: where do you think it goes?

Join wacky expert Professor Pufferfish and field agent Greene McClean for World Environment Day. Image: ANMM.

Join wacky expert Professor Pufferfish and field agent Greene McClean for World Environment Day. Image: ANMM.

Join wacky expert Professor Pufferfish and field agent Greene McClean will find out what happens to the rubbish we leave behind. If it finds its way into our drains and waterways it can affect our wildlife and our environment. During this virtual excursion students work with our intrepid investigators to work out how we can all help in a practical way.

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NAIDOC week: unlock water and Indigenous People

NAIDOC week with the ANMM via the Virtual Classroom. Image: ANMM.

NAIDOC week with the ANMM via the Virtual Classroom. Image: ANMM.

A virtual excursion suitable for students in Years 3 to 6

To celebrate NAIDOC week, Indigenous Programs Manager Donna Carstens and special guest Uncle Terry will discuss the cultural significance of water to Indigenous people.

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Inspiring stories with Jeannie Baker

 Jeannie Baker illustration from her book Circle.

Detail from the cover of Jeannie Baker’s new book ‘Circle’. Image: Jeannie Baker.

The Australian National Maritime Museum is proud to host award winning children’s author and artist Jeannie Baker for an exclusive chat. Join us as we talk to Jeannie about her new picture Circle. Find out about Jeannie, her background, her inspirations and what it like creating a picture book.

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Cook and Banks: Charting the rumoured great Southern Land

This lithographed is based on the drawings by Louisa Mundy, the wife of Colonel Godfrey Mundy. It was published in Colonel Mundy's 'Our Antipodes' in 1852. This work depicts Government House, Sydney, sitting high on a hill overlooking Farm Cove and Sydney Harbour. Image: ANMM Collection 00000889.

This lithographed is based on the drawings by Louisa Mundy, the wife of Colonel Godfrey Mundy. It was published in Colonel Mundy’s ‘Our Antipodes’ in 1852. This work depicts Government House, Sydney, sitting high on a hill overlooking Farm Cove and Sydney Harbour. Image: ANMM Collection 00000889.

To celebrate the Royal Botanical Gardens Sydney 200th anniversary, the Australian National Maritime Museum and Royal Botanical Gardens Sydney will offering a joint video conference for year 3 and 4 students History and Science.

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A Brighter Future: The Second Annual Women and Science Symposium

In celebration of International Women’s Day on 8th March 2016, the Australian National Maritime Museum will host our second annual Women and Science Symposium for high school students.

Women in Science Symposium 2015

Women in Science Symposium 2015

It all started with a discussion with my daughter, about the number of girls opting out of studying science because of negative stereotypes. She said it was such a shame that girls were not considering science as a worthwhile option to study. As an environmental scientist, she knows that those girls are locking themselves out of some amazing careers.

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Remembrance Day and the War in the Pacific Virtual Excursion

Remembrance Day, 2014. ANMM marks the WWI armistice with its Remembrance Day event, November 2014. MV KRAIT is pictured with wreaths .

The Australian National Maritime Museum marked the WWI armistice with its Remembrance Day event, November 2014. MV Krait is pictured with wreaths.

One of the things I love the most about working at the Australian National Maritime Museum is the ability to collaborate with other people on amazing projects. The education team have a project coming up soon that I am very excited about.

It all started with an exchange with David Foley (Manager of NSW DART Connections) and Paul Heinz from Hawaii’s Arizona memorial now known as the World War II Valor in the Pacific National Monument. Both thought it would be valuable to link students in the United States and Australia around the topic of the World War II with a focus on the conflict in and around the Pacific Ocean. The museum became involved after we were approached to tell the Australian story, thus the collaboration formed.

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Inspiring Stories: Women In Science Symposium

Young Scientist

Young Scientist. Image credit: Maja Baska 2014

It all started with a discussion with my environmental scientist daughter about the numbers of girls opting out of science and scientific careers because of negative stereotypes. We had been talking about some of the scientists I have met and worked with here at the museum and their incredible experiences.

She said it was such a shame that, by not considering science as an option, girls were locking themselves out of some amazing careers. She also found it disappointing that those stories aren’t common knowledge, or available to students making decisions about their future. Continue reading

The man who lived underwater

What do you say to someone who has lived underwater?

Or has propelled himself through the Greek islands in a human-powered submarine, visited Antarctica and even holds a Guinness World Record for the most electricity generated by pedalling underwater?

Strangely enough meeting underwater pioneer Lloyd Godson led to one of the most interesting and fascinating conversations of my life.

Lloyd Godson

Image courtesy Lloyd Godson

Lloyd Godson

Image courtesy Lloyd Godson

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Inspiring Stories: NASA Administrator Bolden coming to ANMM!

Administrator Charles F Bolden Jr, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Photo: NASA, Bill Ingalls

Administrator Charles F Bolden Jr, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)
Photo: NASA, Bill Ingalls

Next Monday 24 March, the museum will host a talk from the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration – Charles F Bolden Jr. Yep, you read correctly, that’s NASA we’re talking about! My answer was “wow”, immediately thinking of the potential this event has to excite and inspire. “When” was my next question? How long do I have to plan and organise a major event? “Two weeks”…“Ok can do, this opportunity is too good to miss!”

So why is Administrator Bolden coming to the museum? He is interested in viewing our HMB Endeavour replica. There is a wooden trunnel located in the great cabin that was on the original HMB Endeavour and then flew on the NASA Space Shuttle Endeavour, (you learn something new every day). There are natural links between the 18th century explorers and the more recent missions out to space, sometimes in more ways than we realise. Continue reading

An epic Antarctic inspiration

I have always been an avid reader, the type of kid that disappeared at Christmas to read the books left by Santa or being told turn off the light and sneaking a torch under the covers just to read just a little bit more.

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Tim Jarvis (middle) at the museum with our director Kevin Sumpton (L) and Michael Harvey, head Audience, Outreach and Exhibitions (R).

As I have gotten older my love of a good story hasn’t waned, just adjusted to my busier life so it takes an extraordinary tale to keep me turning the pages late into the night. It really doesn’t surprise anyone who knows me that I work in a museum surrounded by thousands of stories.

One adventure that has recently kept me up to the wee small hours is Shackleton’s boat journey written by a New Zealand ship’s captain FA Worsley, originally published in 1940. The most incredible thing about this book was that it was a factual account of the Ernest Shackleton’s expedition to Antarctica, and the journey undertaken to save the lives of his men after the ship Endurance became stuck and crushed in the ice in the Wendell Sea on his way to Antarctica.

If I had been given the narrative without knowing a little of the background, I would have thought it was an amazing story full of heroism, determination and leadership. However, as part of my research the book provided a compelling and valuable insight as to conditions the men endured. Written today, editors would have labelled it not believable and a work of fantasy, nobody could survive in the conditions they endured (certainly not me, give me a tropical island any day). But of course, just to prove my thinking wrong, Australian environmental scientist and adventurer Tim Jarvis and his team have just recreated the sea and land crossing Shackleton undertook in his traditional gear.

I came across the Ernest Shackleton expedition and polar explorers late last year when I was asked to write some educational resources to support Tim’s re-creation of  Shackleton’s expedition. You could say that was a fascinating process for me to explore the history of the original expedition, collaborate with Tim’s Shackleton Epic team and to have access to some of their amazing images of Antarctica. (Antarctica is now moving up on my list of places to travel to one day if I can just get around the, it’s freezing issue).

I’m conscious of not spoiling the whole story to those uninitiated with the tale and to always leave your audience wanting more, I will finish here with a link to Shackleton Epic webpage. For teachers interested in the education resources they can be found on the museum’s teacher resources webpage.

Anne
Education officer

Adventures of an education officer

Photo of Anne the education officer

Anne is the Education Officer at the museum.

A wise person once told me that the day you stop learning is the day you stop breathing. Never a truer statement could be made since I joined the museum as an education officer nearly eight months ago.

I have learnt a variety of amazing things from the small incidental knowledge such as wearing a skirt when visiting the submarine is not really advised, to the difference between a boat and a ship (when in doubt you can call them a vessel). The lee-side is not next to Lee, but a quieter area of the ocean out of the wind. I think I have nearly nailed port and starboard. I have also had training to plan and program lessons for schools also the many timetables and rosters for the on-site school visits as well as dressing up as a pirate. You could say my day is as interesting as it is educational.

Scuba diver searching the ocean floor during a reconnaissance trip to Frederick Reef October 2009

Photo from a reconnaissance trip to Frederick Reef October 2009. Copyright: Xanthe Rivett

This brings me to my next lesson. The education team is entering the world of video conferencing, which is a huge and exciting undertaking in its self. Imagine being able to share the museum with kids from all over Australia and potentially even the world. Our first video conference into schools has an extra degree of difficulty – we will be broadcasting from our maritime archaeology expedition at Ferguson Reef, off the coast of far north Queensland. So suddenly my learning curve has tilted to a near 90 angle.

However, all is not lost!

The best part of working in an organisation like this is that I have access to professional and generous people to help me on my learning journey. So over the next few weeks in particular I will be documenting my journey from learning about maritime archaeology, blogging and social media, and of course, understanding and working the video conferencing equipment.

Oh, the most exciting part – I will be going on the expedition as well so I will be on the scene to tell you what is happening up there.

Anne
Education Officer