New Ideas on Old Wars – The Archaeology of War

Maritime archaeologists and technicians study the shipboard computer screens during the 3D photographic survey of submarine HMAS <em>AE1</em>, in early 2018. Image courtesy Navigea Ltd.

Maritime archaeologists and technicians study the shipboard computer screens during the 3D photographic survey of submarine HMAS AE1, in early 2018. Image courtesy Navigea Ltd.

Expanding the Archaeologist’s toolkit

Once upon a time, the archaeologist’s toolkit was likely to consist of a shovel, trowel, bucket, brush, stakes and string. Today it includes a multitude of technological tools such as magnetometers, drones, ground-penetrating radar, 3D imaging and all sorts of acronyms including DGPS, LIDAR, ROVs, AUVs and many more. In the past, archaeologists were digging trenches in the ground or diving in shallow waters. These days even the roughest terrain and deepest of waters can be part of the archaeologists working environment. What was once thought impossible is increasingly possible – for example, the search for Australia’s first submarine AE1, lost in 1914 and thought one of the greatest unsolved Australian maritime mysteries, is now complete.

Today, an archaeologist can ‘look’ below the ground without even digging, they can send remote operating vehicles to incredible depths under water, and some are even investigating the potential for an ‘archaeology of the air’. And now with DNA analysis archaeologists can construct very human pictures from old bones.

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The saga of Skaubryn

The Camenzuli family in Paola, Malta, a few days before their departure for Australia on <em>Skaubryn</em>, 1958. From left: Lucy, Lina, Georgina, Zaren, Mary and Joyce. Reproduced courtesy Camenzuli family.

The Camenzuli family in Paola, Malta, a few days before their departure for Australia on Skaubryn, 1958. From left: Lucy, Lina, Georgina, Zaren, Mary and Joyce. Reproduced courtesy Camenzuli family.

It’s International Museum Day, an annual event that raises awareness about the role of museums in cultural exchange and the development of mutual understanding. This year’s theme of ‘hyperconnected museums’ focuses on how museums can make their collections accessible and connect with local communities. It’s a theme that is pertinent to our Remembering Skaubryn: 60 years on exhibition, which is drawn from an important collection of photographs documenting the fire and rescue on the Norwegian migrant liner Skaubryn in 1958. Skaubryn was carrying 1,080 passengers, mostly German and Maltese migrants, and was the only vessel lost at sea during the era of post-war migration to Australia.

We have been amazed by the public response to Remembering Skaubryn, with offers of material for our collection, oral history interviews, and visits from survivors, their families and descendants, as well as local community groups such as the Australian-German Welfare Society. It has been wonderful to hear from visitors who have found a personal connection to the exhibition, reminding us that immigration is lived history but also living history, where the impacts of life-changing migrant voyages resonate right down through the generations. Continue reading

Remembering the marvelous maritime mothers

Making it look easy, Ethel May Sterling and her daughter Margaret aboard her husband's ship, <em>ER Sterling</em>. ANMM Collection 00035539.

Making it look easy, Ethel May Sterling and her daughter Margaret aboard her husband’s ship, ER Sterling. ANMM Collection 00035539.

Mothering on the high seas

As Mother’s Day approaches a maritime museum is not usually a place one would look for motherly sentiment. Yet here at the museum and the Vaughan Evans Library, there are small yet extraordinary reminders of what motherhood can mean. And how hard it can be for some.

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Welcome Wall May 2018

358 names were added to the Welcome Wall during a ceremony on Sunday 6 May 2018. It is the 79th bronze panel added to the Wall and there are now almost 30,000 names on the Wall, which celebrates Australia's waves of migration. Image: Andrew Frolows/ANMM.

358 names were added to the Welcome Wall during a ceremony on Sunday 6 May 2018. It is the 79th bronze panel added to the Wall and there are now almost 30,000 names on the Wall, which celebrates Australia’s waves of migration. Image: Andrew Frolows/ANMM.

Last weekend the much-loved sports journalist and soccer broadcaster, Les Murray, was honoured by his family to have his name unveiled on the museum’s Welcome WallThe Welcome Wall pays tribute to the migrants who have travelled the world to call Australia home. More than 200 countries are represented on the Welcome Wall, which faces Darling Harbour and Pyrmont Bay, where many migrants arrived in Australia. 

358 names were added to the Welcome Wall during Sunday’s ceremony including families from the United Kingdom, Italy, Greece, Germany, Malta, Hungary, Ireland, South Africa, Croatia, Yugoslavia, Poland, The Netherlands, China, India, Sri Lanka, Ukraine, Latvia, Slovenia, Turkey, Argentina, Cyprus, Czechoslovakia, Estonia, France, Indonesia, Lebanon, Macedonia, New Zealand, Portugal, USA, Austria, Denmark, Fiji, Kazakhstan, Lithuania, Namibia, Russia, Spain and Zambia. It is the 79th bronze panel added to the Wall and there are now almost 30,000 names on the Wall.

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The Last Dance

Join the staff and volunteers of the Australian National Maritime Museum as our collection comes to life in the spirit of Museum Dance Off 2018. With a guest appearance from Sydney Heritage Fleet, come aboard our tall ships, below deck of the submarine HMAS Onslow, conga through our outdoor Containers exhibition and much more. Still: Kate Pentecost/ANMM.

Join the staff and volunteers of the Australian National Maritime Museum as our collection comes to life in the spirit of Museum Dance Off 2018. Still: Kate Pentecost/ANMM.

Museum Dance Off 2018

We are a passionate bunch here at the Australian National Maritime Museum. We preserve and bring to life Australia’s maritime history, through exhibitions, public programs and even this blog, but rarely do we use dance as our primary communication medium.

Until now…

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The Sydney Ducks and the San Francisco 49ers

BEWARE! Engraving, c 1872, Matt Morgan in Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. What ties San Francisco 1856 to the Australian National Maritime Museum Collection? ANMM Collection <a href="http://collections.anmm.gov.au/en/objects/details/29928/beware?ctx=ad66dbba-8a2a-47eb-99d3-5c8285fcba37&amp;idx=0">00019630</a>.

BEWARE! Engraving, c 1872, Matt Morgan in Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper. What ties San Francisco 1856 to the Australian National Maritime Museum Collection? ANMM Collection 00019630.

An enigmatic engraving

I often come across intriguing objects as I digitise the collection. Recently, in a box containing 263 engravings, covering topics including migration, the wrecking of vessels and ambitious shipbuilding commissions, there was one object which stood out: An engraving, illustrated by Matt Morgan, from Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper (c 1872).

It appeared to be a depiction of the American ‘Lady Justice’, an allegorical personification of the moral force of judicial systems. Oddly, she was depicted here with neither her balanced scales nor the blindfold of impartiality. Standing beside her were a group of politicians, all cowering under her gaze as she pointed towards a historical event from six years earlier. The event, headed by the words ‘San Francisco 1856’, depicts a public lynching. I was instantly curious and so put my detective’s hat on: What was the historical precedent that influenced Matt Morgan’s choice of subject?

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