A sea serpent and a lightship

The sea serpent Jormungand arches its back over the entrance to Wetworld on the museum’s wharf. It looks as if Jormungand is talking with the red lightship called Carpentaria which is on display tied up at the museum beside Wetworld.

The sea serpent Jormungand arches its back over the entrance to Viking Wetworld on the museum’s wharf. It looks as if Jormungand is talking with the red lightship called Carpentaria which is on display tied up at the museum beside Viking Wetworld.

Gold and silver, blue and green – these are the colours of the sea serpent’s shimmering scales that arches its back over the entrance to Viking Wetworld, open at the museum until 2 February 2014.

Jormungand, the sea serpent in Norse mythology grew so large that it encircled Midgard (the earth). The Vikings believed it lived at the bottom of the ocean, a force to be feared and respected as it held the world together.

All things Viking are happening at the museum with the stunning exhibition Vikings – Beyond the Legend, which is in its last days and closing on 2 February 2014.

Below are some behind-the-scenes shots of Jormungand, the sea serpent being made here at the museum.

Jormungand’s scales go on with the use of a stencil in the museum’s workshop

Jormungand’s scales go on with the use of a stencil in the museum’s workshop


Jormungand’s scales

Jormungand’s scales

Carpentaria is a floating lighthouse that spent most of its service life in the Gulf of Carpentaria, hence its name. It is one of four un-crewed lightships that were built at Cockatoo Island Dockyards in Sydney Harbour in 1916–1917. It stayed in service until 1985, and now it is part of the museum’s historic fleet of vessels which also includes a pearl shelling lugger and the WW11 commando raider MV Krait.

Adrienne Kabos
Designer

2 thoughts on “A sea serpent and a lightship

  1. I have fond memories of the Carpentaria shoal buoy which saved my bacon when driving my patrol boat BARBETTE eastwards towards Torres Strait in 1979. We hadn’t had a position since passing Cape Wessel & were running on dead reckoning as conditions were overcast & star/sun sights were impossible & there was no GPS around then. Luckily the XO, who was on watch at the time, managed to get a very weak paint on the radar which turned out to be the the shoal buoy & we were well north of where we thought we were heading into uncharted territory. phew.

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